Category: Everything Old is New Again

This series is inspired by antique imagery, which is reinvented in fabric.

Frozen in Time II

Frozen in Time II

Frozen in Time II is a translucent art quilt that incorporates many hand-worked and underappreciated vintage crochet pieces layered between hand-dyed sheer fabrics.  It hangs away from the wall to allow for shadow play behind the piece.  Rust-dyed and machine stitched.  This was included in the Visions Art Museum show, Iterpretations: Conversations exhibition.  Photo by Jack Kulawik.

Frozen in Time II is perhaps an elegy for lost arts and loved ones.

Frozen in Time II, 50'' x 34'' by Mary Vaneecke
Frozen in Time II, 50” x 34” by Mary Vaneecke
Frozen in Time II by Mary Vaneecke, detail.
Frozen in Time II by Mary Vaneecke, detail.
Frozen in Time I

Frozen in Time I

Frozen in Time I, with detail.  (Photo by Jack Kulawik).  This new art quilt combines new hand-dyed silk fabrics with vintage handworked crochet (makers unknown).  Rust dyed, layered and stitched on eco-felt.

This piece continues a new series utilizing under-appreciated handwork of unknown makers.

Frozen in Time I by Mary Vaneecke. 43.5'' x 34.5'' 2016.
Frozen in Time I  by Mary Vaneecke. 43.5” x 34.5” 2016.

 

Frozen in Time I by Mary Vaneecke detail
Frozen in Time I, detail. By Mary Vaneecke

 

Northern Lights

Northern Lights

Northern Lights, a vintage linen napkin (maker unknown), has been painstakingly folded, stitched, and hand-dyed in a mandala-type design.

Northern Lights, by Mary Vaneecke. 18'' x 18'' Hand-dyed vintage linen napkin, layered and stitched. Stretched on a frame.
Northern Lights, by Mary Vaneecke. 18” x 18” Hand-dyed vintage linen napkin, layered and stitched. Stretched on a frame.
Elegy for the Beautiful Son

Elegy for the Beautiful Son

The Beautiful Son, hand-dyed, hand-worked liturgical linen (maker unknown), layered and quilted with the names of African American boys and men killed at the hands of police, and burned.
Elegy for the Beautiful Son, hand-dyed, hand-worked liturgical linen (maker unknown), layered and quilted with the names of African American boys and men killed at the hands of police, then burned. 36” x 33”.  It is part of the Sacred Threads 2017 exhibition.  
Elegy for the Beautiful Son by Mary Vaneecke.
Elegy for the Beautiful Son by Mary Vaneecke, detail.

Abuela Reads the Headlines

Abuela Reads the Headlines , 2015

Abuela is Spanish for grandmother.  I imagine her in her barrio (neighborhood) garden in my hometown, Tucson, surrounded by an ocotillo (a living, cactus-type) fence.  She has her handwork and the blessed Virgin of Guadalupe nearby, with a grandchild at her knee.  Abuela scans the headlines about America’s current immigration policy, and weeps.

Materials:  vintage handworked textiles (makers unknown), felted wool, embellishing (480 jewelry spikes), cotton and cotton-silk fabric, dyeing, discharging, silk sari ‘yarn,’ window screen, acrylic felt, embellishments (milagros and crystal rosary), synthetic organza.

Techniques:  dyeing, heat and chemical burning, wet felting, hand stitching, couching, machine stitch, discharging, devore, dyeing, cutting.

Abuela Reads the Headlines, 55''h x 84''
Abuela Reads the Headlines, 55”h x 84”
Abuela Reads the Headlines, detai
Abuela Reads the Headlines, detail
We Came to America

We Came to America

We Came to America

My paternal grandparents, Firmin and Lucie VanEecke, lived the great American Dream.  I have long let a quilt in their honor ‘percolate’ in the back of my mind.  They met and married in Belgium between the World Wars and came here in 1923 by ship, as millions of immigrants have done throughout our history.  World War I decimated Belgium, and they sought a better life here while feeling the separation and loss of loved ones left behind, most of whom they never saw again.  Lucie and Firmin  flourished in the US, had five children, nine grandchildren, and many great-grandchildren.  This work features hand-dyed vintage lace textiles, copies of their last letters home (in Flemish), and their wedding portrait.  The piece is quilted with the phrase We Came to America in the languages of many other immigrants who came to America.  In a private collection.

We Came to America, 45'' x 48'', 2015
We Came to America, 45” x 48”, 2015
We Came to America, detail
We Came to America, detail
Abuela’s Garden – SOLD

Abuela’s Garden – SOLD

Abuela’s Garden, 2015

The Barrio Viejo (old neighborhood) of my hometown is home to many Mexican immigrants.  Their distinctive gardens are often surrounded by an ocotillo fence, a living fence made of a cactus-like plant.  The gardens will contain flowers like marigolds and sunflowers, and foods that remind residents of home.  Neighbors share seeds and cuttings, and other fruits of their labor.  What a lovely metaphor for migration and transplantation.

Materials include hand-dyed and painted handmade textiles (makers unknown), felted wool ropes, new fabrics, silk sari ‘yarn,’ window screen, felt, and machine stitch.   In a private collection.ABUELA'S GARDEN copy

My Mother is a Fish

My Mother is a Fish24” x 24”  The title of this piece comes from the William Faulkner novel, As I Lay Dying. A 14th Century Mongolian platter inspired the work.  It is a wholecloth quilt, meaning the top layer is a single piece of fabric.  The design comes entirely from dark blue thread on white fabric.  My Mother is a Fish has been exhibited widely and was published in an article in the October-November issue of Quilting Arts Magazine.

Homage

Homage
Inspired by Susan McCord’s 1880s applique masterpiece, the Vine Quilt, the original has 3000 pieced leaves running up and down 13 rows.  I wanted to create an homage to the original, recreating it with contemporary techniques.  I quilted pairs of fanciful feather variations and then colored each one with pencil.  A fixative was then painted onto the fabric.  This piece was a winner of the 2010 Handiquilter Longarm Quilting Award in Paducah, KY.

 

 

America Surrounded

America Surrounded70” x 65”  This piece is my re-interpretation of the traditional Revolutionary War-era quilt block, Burgoyne Surrounded.  I updated it by replacing the traditional square grid with a triangular grid and using paint, printing, and discharging techniques instead of traditional piecing.  Made from cotton fabrics, discharged, painted and screen printed, layered with felt and machine stitched.

Fragment – SOLD

Fragment38”x 32” This piece is inspired by an ancient Egyptian fragment of carved and painted stone.  It depicts a wetland teeming with life.  Techniques include discharged and torn fabric, layered, machine stitched, and hand painted. The gray area is exposed and painted batting.  Embellished with silk ribbon.  SOLD